Forest fire destroys jobs of pine resin collectors


Christos Livas, 48, resin collector uses a tool as looks a burnet pine tree in a pine forest near Agdines village on the island of Evia, about 185 kilometers (115 miles) north of Athens, Greece, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021. Residents in the north of the Greek island of Evia have made their living from the dense pine forests surrounding their villages for generations. Tapping the pine trees for their resin has been a key source of income for hundreds of families. But hardly any forests are left after one of Greece’s most destructive single wildfires in decades rampaged across northern Evia for days. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

AGDINES, Greece (AP) - For generations, residents in the north of the Greek island of Evia have made their living from the dense pine forests surrounding their villages. Tapping the ubiquitous Aleppo pines for their resin, the viscous, sticky substance the trees use to protect themselves from insects and disease, provided a key source of income for hundreds of families.


But now, hardly any forest is left. A devastating wildfire, one of Greece’s most destructive single blazes in decades, rampaged across northern Evia for days earlier this month, swallowing woodland, homes and businesses and sending thousands fleeing.


The damage won’t just affect this year’s crop, resin collectors and beekeepers say, but for generations