For the youth of Greece

The establishment of new universities and faculties became entangled with untrammeled electoral pledges in the post-junta era. It ended up serving economic objectives more than academic aims.



In the first post- WWII decades and in the post-Civil War reorganisation and reconstruction of the country, university admission was a popular yearning and a youthful dream.


It guided the youth and mobilised their families, especially poorer ones that sought a better future for their children.


A university degree was identified with progress, professional grounding, and social mobility. It was seen as a passport to a better life.

In the period of the booming economy it became a universal demand of society and of the political establishment that led in 1964 to the great educational reform with free university studies without tuition.


At the same time, there began a long process of rebirth and of enriching the tertiary education terrain with the creation of a host of provincial universities with hundreds of faculties.


Over time, however, as usual in our country, the erstwhile universal demand was mistreated. The establishment of new universities and faculties became entangled with untrammeled electoral pledges in the post-junta era. It ended up serving economic objectives more than academic aims.